Category Archives: Richard Arena

Restoring Constitutional Government

By
Richard Arena

Serious students of the Constitution know that the federal government is operating well beyond the bounds of the powers the states delegated to it. Those who defend this extra-constitutional power expansion argue that the Founders could not have envisioned the complexities and advanced technologies of the 21st century and therefore the need for corresponding additional federal powers.

In fact the Framers did anticipate the need to modify the Constitution to meet unforeseen future circumstances. That is the purpose of Article V which provides two methods for the states to amend the Constitution. (Congress may propose amendments, but … Read more...

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The Real Solution for Traffic Congestion

By
Richard Arena

Three years ago Metro-Atlanta voters roundly rejected a one percent (1%) transportation tax when the public learned that the proposed T-SPLOST was not a remedy for Atlanta’s chronic traffic congestion as promoted but actually a taxpayer funded stimulus for developers who planned to transform Metro-Atlanta from a predominantly suburban landscape into a high-density, high-rise environment concentrated along MARTA rail lines.

While Metro voters roundly rejected urbanization, still the state, some municipalities and other parties with vested interests haven’t given up on their plans to stack-and-pack we the unwashed into multifamily housing and have us riding cheek-to-jowl on … Read more...

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Two More Outlandish Rulings – Now What?

By
Richard J. Arena

Two shocking rulings handed down by the Supreme Court this week – one, King V. Burwell, rewriting the precise language of the Affordable Health Care Act, the other, Obergefell V. Hodges, assuming federal authority to define marriage, illuminate a central flaw in the American system of government – as it now exists. That flaw is the lack of a realistic institutional check on unconstitutional federal activities.
There was such a check prior to the adaptation of the 17th Amendment in 1913. Until then US Senators were appointed by their respective state legislatures, who also held the … Read more...

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Checking Federal Power Abuse

By
Richard Arena

The Tea Party movement began when the silent majority finally found its voice (and feet) in 2009.  Millions of Americans across the width and breadth of the county marched to their town squares, state capitols and the Washington Mall to tell their elected representatives they had had enough of government exercising powers beyond the bounds of the Constitution.

How the federal government came to exercise powers prohibited is a long and oft times controversial tale. Following is a Readers Digest version along with a suggestion for what can be done about it – other than march on … Read more...

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